The Best Guide to Christmas Lights in Barcelona

The Christmas lights in Barcelona are here! The evenings are now brightly lit by a plethora of shining lights that adorn the streets of the city.

Barcelona is a city with wide avenues, tree-lined boulevards, winding streets and charming squares – 100 km of which are brimming with festive cheer. We’ve put together this guide to the Christmas Lights in Barcelona so you can revel in the start of the festive season and do some last-minute Christmas shopping under the bright lights of the city.

The City Council claim this year’s Christmas lights in Barcelona are bigger and better than ever before. Let’s see if it’s true!

Christmas lights in Barcelona
Christms lights in Barcelona – Pic by Mònica Moreno

When can I see the Christmas lights in Barcelona?

The Christmas lights in Barcelona were switched on last Wednesday 24th with an event in Plaça Catalunya. Despite the heavy rainfall that day, the act finally took place at 8pm with live performances.

These shining decorations will adorn the city until 6 January. The lights will be turned on between 5:30pm and 11pm from Thursday to Sunday. What’s more, on Friday and Saturday the lights will stay on until midnight, and on New Year’s Eve and the eve before the day of the Three Kings (6 January) they will stay on until 2am.

Where can I see the Christmas lights in Barcelona?

With over 100 kilometres of Barcelona’s street adorned in shining Christmas lights, you really can’t miss these beautiful displays of festive cheer. But, just in case, we’ve made this complete guide to the Christmas lights in Barcelona to make sure you don’t miss a single one!

Plaça Catalunya:

Draped in what could be rays of sunlight, this year’s Christmas lights in Barcelona’s central Plaça Catalunya are an explosion of celebration and aim to boost local commerce in the surrounding areas.

This new design by the studio Estudi Antoni Arola – which uses sustainable LED tubing – will flicker on and off, mimicking the beating heart of the city. Don’t miss the hypnotising lights that will also adorn the square’s beautiful fountains. What better place to take a stroll before doing some Christmas shopping!

Gran Vía de les Corts Catalanes

This year’s Christmas lights in Barcelona on Gran Vía hang above pedestrians and passing traffic in the form of large cylindrical lamps of varying sizes.

Feel at home on one of the city’s main avenues with these comforting and familiar lights that replace the typical “chin-chin” and “muac muac” Christmas lights in Barcelona.

Plaça Urquinaona

The Christmas lights in Barcelona that adorn Plaça Urquinaona are a soothing shade of blue. Hundreds of small circles of light hang above one of the main squares in the centre of the city’s shopping area.

Via Laietana

The Christmas Lights in Barcelona will also light up Via Laietana in a festive display of sparkling baubles and adornments.

Passeig de Gràcia

Passeig de Gràcia, with the neighbourhoods of Dreta de l’Eixample on its right and Esquerra de L’Eixample on its left, is one of the city’s most famous shopping streets.

This is an unmissable stop on your tour of Christmas lights in Barcelona. This sprawling avenue, just like last year, is turned into a fairytale with twinkling lights that look like stars and delicate butterflies.

And after you’ve marvelled at the lights, why not discover some of the streets luxury brands from Gucci, Guess, Chanel and Massimo Dutti, and high street favourites including Mango, Zara and H&M. Or do a bit of sightseeing at the popular Gaudí houses of La Pedrera and Casa Batlló.

Carrer Aragó

This year’s Christmas lights in Barcelona on Carrer Aragó sparkle in the form of large-scale LED stars or snowflakes. This minimalistic design replaces the street’s famous ceiling of lights.

Also, for the first time the city’s name will be on full display. Don’t miss the large red letters spelling out “Barcelona” on Gran Vía (Bailén/Muntaner) and Carrer Aragó (Bailén/Aribau). Perfect for snapping an instagrammable festive photo!

Hospital Sant Pau de Barcelona

After being welcomed by city’s including Madrid, Berlin and London, this winter wonderland makes its way to Barcelona. From 22 November to 9 January, visit this fairytale-like Christmas Garden named “Els Llums de Sant Pau” (The Lights of Sant Pau) for a truly festive experience.

The garden is open from 6:30pm to 10:30pm. We recommend buying your ticket in advance here.

Finally, another place you can also catch the Christmas lights in Barcelona is Ronda Sant Pere. For the first time this avenue will be decked out between Passeig de Sant Joan and Urquinaona. There will also be shining Christmas lights on Avinguda del Paral·lel and Travessera de Gràcia.

And why not discover the Christmas lights in Barcelona from the comfort of the city’s Christmas Bus tour? Discover the most magical time of the year on a 90-minute nocturnal tour brimming with light, joy and festive cheer. Find out more here.

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The oldest Barcelona Christmas Market, Fira de Santa LLúcia

A visit to a Barcelona Christmas Market is the best way to sample the city’s Christmas Spirit.  The oldest one in the city is the Fira de Santa Llúcia – situated in front of the Barcelona Cathedral at Avinguda de la Catedral.  It’s right in the centre of city and full of seasonal hustle and bustle, while brimming with traditional Catalan Christmas trinkets and decorations for house and garden.


Barcelona Christmas Market
This Barcelona Christmas Market was created to celebrate the feast day of Santa LLúcia on December 13, but has now grown into a major part of the city’s Yuletide celebrations.  This year, it runs from November 26, through to December 23.

What to find in this Barcelona Christmas Market

There are over 250 stalls which are arranged in 4 distinct sections; Nativity Scenes & Figurines, Greenery and Plants (which includes fresh mistletoe for romantic visitors), Crafts & Fabrics and Traditional Musical Instruments.

It still is a very traditional Christmas market, but over time the Fira de Santa Llúcia has grown and grown.  Today, it supplies additional products like toys and games for the children as well as decorations, hand crafted gifts and artisan products.  Expect to see the traditional specialty on display, turrón, a baked cake of nougat made of honey, egg white and sugar with toasted almonds, or nuts with a rice paper coating. Buy two, so at least one gets to make its way home with you!

Among the many religious and more modern gift ideas, a few of the more traditional decorations items are on display and for sale.  However, no Barcelona Christmas market would be complete without the infamous Caganer figures, a key fixture for the Catalan nativity scene, referred to as ‘El Pesebre’.  This normally depicts a peasant defecating and the Caganer’s exact origins are pretty much unknown.  But there he is, often hidden away in the far corner of a nativity scene, typically nowhere near the manger or main characters.  The Catalan tradition is to have children find the hidden figure.

El Caganer - Barcelona Christmas Market

El Tió de Nadal

This leads to another fascinating tradition… the Tió de Nadal or Christmas log.  The children will recite a famous song about el Tió de Nadal and before beating the Tió all the kids have to leave the room to pray, asking for the Tió to deliver a lot of presents.  This makes the perfect excuse for the relatives to do the trick and put the presents under a blanket behind the Tió while the kids are praying.  The Tió is not for large gifts, as they are brought by the three Kings on January 6th, but they are used more for smaller, communal gifts, treats and dried fruits that are shared by the whole brood… all of which are on offer at this Barcelona Christmas market.

Tió de Nadal - Fira de Santa Llúcia

How to get to Fira de Santa Llúcia

Due to the traffic jams during christmas holidays, we recommend you to get there using public transport. If you take the Metro, you can stop in Jaume I station (L4) and walk 3 minutes until the Cathedral.

Also you can stop in Plaça Catalunya, go down Portal de l’Àngel and have a walk in the main shopping street of the city until you get to the Cathedral (10 minutes walking)

The best way to discover this Barcelona’s Christmas Market is to rent a beautiful apartment in the city centre close by all the Christmas action, then please see our apartments in Barcelona here and book your festive vacation in Barcelona with us.

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Public Transport in Barcelona (How to Get Around Barcelona)

Guessing how to use public transport in Barcelona?

Public transport in any city can be an odyssey, but with this complete guide to getting around Barcelona we’ve got you covered.

Moving around Barcelona is easy and also fun thanks to its public network of commuter trains, buses, metros, trams, and even a cable car.

You’ve booked your apartment with bizFlats, but now you probably have any questions like, how much is public transport in Barcelona? And, what is the bus timetable?

Read on to find the answers these questions and more!

Public transport in Barcelona: Metro

There are a total of eight metro lines throughout the city to take you from one side to the other. The metro is often the transport of choice for locals and tourists alike thanks to its 161 stations dotted around the city and reduced waiting times. It is truly a quick and easy way to get around.

Metro tickets

When getting your ticket, it’s important to know that the city’s public transport system is integrated, meaning its tickets are valid for all modes of public transport (metro, bus, commuter train and tram), for a duration of 1 hour and 15 minutes. What’s more, if you’re staying within the city a Zone 1 ticket will suffice.

Tickets can be bought from the ticket offices or machines located in the stations themselves. Don’t forget to insert your ticket into the ticket turnstile to access the platforms. In every station you’ll find a map and list of stops for the line you’re travelling on.

Public transport in Barcelona - Metro Map Barcelona
Public Transport in Barcelona – Metro Map

Types of public transport ticket

Choose your tickets depending on how long you’re staying in the city and how many trips you need to make. As mentioned, these tickets are valid for the city’s tram, bus and metro services:

  • Single trip: €2.40
  • T-Casual: €11.35 (10 trips)
  • T-Usual: from €40 (unlimited, 30 days)
  • T-Familiar: €10 (8 trips, interchangeable)

There is also the exclusive Hola Barcelona ticket starting at €14.67, and valid for 48, 72, 96 or 120 hours, which gives unlimited travel throughout the city and includes the airport train and Montjuic cable car.

Metro timetable

The Barcelona metro runs from 5 am to midnight on Monday to Thursday, Sundays and bank holidays (you can check a list of local holidays for 2021 here). On Fridays and the eve before bank holidays it runs from 5 am to 2 am.

Public transport in Barcelona: Buses

With more than 1,000 buses, getting around Barcelona couldn’t be easier. What’s more, these hybrid vehicles are better for the environment and are one of the cleanest bus services in Europe. We recommend checking the official bus map here so you can plan your trip.

The buses in Barcelona have a number and either the letter V (vertical), H (horizontal) and D (diagonal) depending on the direction they travel in the city or N (night) for the nocturnal buses, which run every half hour after 10.40 pm.

To know which bus you should take from one place to another you can use this website: Vull Anar

Bus tickets

The tickets for the bus are the same as those mentioned above for the metro and can be bought at metro stations, ticket machines at bus stops and stations, and online and on the TMB app. Don’t forget to validate your ticket once on board.

Bus timetable

The timetable depends on the particular bus line you wish to take. The majority start between 5 am and 8 am and run until 10–11 pm.

Barcelona Tourist Bus

The Barcelona City Tour is the city’s official hop-on hop-off service for tourists. Tickets start at €27 for adults and €14.40 for children and can be bought online here.

These red double-decker buses run from 9 am to 7 pm and offer a West route (including La Rambla, Montjuic and Camp Nou) and an East route (including the Sagrada Família, Tibidabo and Park Güell).

Airport Public transport in Barcelona

There are several ways to get to and from the airport in Barcelona.

– The metro line (L) runs to both T1 and T2 and a one-way ticket is €5.15.

– The aerobus service, which starts and ends at Plaça Cataluña (and has several stops in the city) also goes to T1 and T2. A one-way ticket costs €5.90 and a round trip is €10.20.

– The train service (R2 Nord) runs from Passeig de Gràcia and Sants Estació and takes around 20–25 minutes. You can check the timetable here and a single ticket costs €4.60.

Aerobus - barcelona bus to airport

Electric motorbikes: getting around Barcelona

Barcelona also has many electric motorbikes that can be rented by the minute. Beat the traffic and get from A to Z easily and quickly with this sustainable form of transport. Check out the following apps that operate in Barcelona to compare availability and prices.

Ecooltra - scooter rental barcelona
  • Ecooltra
  • Yego
  • SCOOT
  • Muving
  • Acciona
  • Reby

For more information about the costs of public transport you can check out our article on the cost of living in Barcelona here and getting a taxi in Barcelona here. We hope this article makes getting around Barcelona a lot easier!

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9 things about Antoni Gaudí that you didn’t know

Antoni Gaudí is a name that is synonymous with Barcelona. Yet who was this curious man who dedicated his life’s work to architecture in Barcelona and its surrounding areas?

You’ve more than likely heard of this great architect and are familiar with some of his great masterpieces. From the Sagrada Família and Park Güell to Casa Battló and the Pedrera, these iconic monuments in Barcelona are a must-see on any visit the city.

Although he started as part of the Catalan modernisme movement, he quickly strayed away and developed his own unique style that has become renowned all over the world.

In this article we’ve put together 10 interesting facts about the man that was Antoni Gaudí. Enjoy!

Antoni Gaudí
9 things about Antoni Gaudí

1. Antoni Gaudí had a difficult childhood

Antoni Gaudí was born in 1852 in the coastal town of Reus where he lived for the first 16 years of his life in a small house with his parents Francesc Gaudí and Antònia Cornet. A sickly child, he suffered from rheumatism from a young age, which prevented him from playing with his friends and living the life of a normal boy. However, it was most likely because of this sad fact that meant the young artist spent a lot of time with his family in nature, which would later prominently feature in his work and become his greatest muse.

2. Antoni Gaudí’s first drawings were published in a school magazine

Around about the age of 15, his first drawings were published in the magazine El Arlequín (The Harlequin), which was edited by his schoolmates Eduard Toda and Josep Ribera (who also went on to become renowned figures). The magazine published mainly humour and poetry alongside Gaudí’s modest illustrations.

3. Antoni Gaudí was not the best student in the class

In 1868, Antoni Gaudí moved to Barcelona to study architecture, which was his greatest passion. However, it is said that he spent hours poring over images of oriental buildings, attending poetry readings and philosophy classes, going to the theatre, taking part in intellectual debates and exploring the surrounding areas of Catalonia.

Antoni Gaudí

4. Antoni Gaudí was a misunderstood revolutionary

Gaudí was terribly misunderstood, even by other artists. George Orwell called the Sagrada Familia one of the most ghastly buildings in the world. Casa Milà, which doesn’t contain a single straight line, was also heavily criticised in the press and was subject to great satire and ridicule. It was even nicknamed “the Wasp’s Nest” and “La Pedrera” (the Stone Quarry), which is the name it is known by today.

5. Antoni Gaudí never married

It is said that Antoni Gaudí only ever proposed marriage to one woman, who turned him down. Pepeta Moreu was Gaudí’s unrequited love. She married several times in her life, however, it was said that she admired Gaudí but didn’t particularly like him. Her refusal led Gaudí to retreat from society and focus on his work, religion and mysticism.

6. Gaudí avoided the use of straight lines in his architecture

As mentioned, in Gaudí’s pieces of architecture it is not uncommon for there not to be a single straight line. The reasons behind this are that he took great inspiration from nature and organically formed structures, which unlike man-made buildings, are curved, leaning, coiled and arched.

7. No one recognised Antoni Gaudí when he died

In the later stages of his life, the great architect dedicated every waking hour to his great masterpiece the Sagrada Família. His humble and rather unkempt appearance meant that, one day when he was unfortunately run over by a passing tram on Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, nobody recognised the great artist and he was mistaken for a homeless vagrant.

8. 7 of Gaudí’s pieces have been declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Despite being a greatly unacknowledged artist of his time, today a total of seven of the artist’s works feature on the prestigious list of World Heritage Sites. The outstanding universal value of the following works has been recognised: Park Güell and the Güell Palace; Casa Mila (also known as La Pedrera); the recently opened Casa Vicens; Gaudí’s work on the Nativity façade and the Crypt of La Sagrada Familia; Casa Batlló; and the Colonia Güell crypt.

9.The Sagrada Família was meant to be finished in 2026

The construction of the Sagrada Família was scheduled to be completed in 2026 to mark 100 years since Antoni Gaudí’s death. However, due to recent events of the pandemic, the date of 2026 has been deemed impossible. Although an alternative date has not been given, the citizens of Barcelona have been assured that work on the Sagrada Família will not cease.

We hope you enjoyed these interesting facts about Antoni Gaudí!

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