Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona

Choosing the places to visit in Barcelona in a city so rich in culture and entertainment, can present quite a challenge, particularly if your time here is limited. In order to help with this dilemma, we have compiled a helpful list of places to visit in Barcleona.

Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona during your stay

  1. La Sagrada Familia

No visit to Barcelona would be complete without a trip to Antoni Guadí´s spectacular church, La Sagrada Familia. The structure, although still incomplete, is a UNESCO world heritage site which welcomes nearly 3 million visitors a year. With this in mind, it is worth buying tickets in advance as queues can be lengthy. Places to visit in Barcelona - sagrada familia

  1. La Pedrera

Continue along the Guadí trail to Casa Milà, commonly known as La Pedrera. This beautiful building, complete with roof terrace, attic space, courtyards and exhibition hall, provides ample opportunity to admire and understand the work of this architectural genius.Places to visit in Barcelona - La Pedrera

  1. Parc Güell

Set on the hillside, Park Güell boasts beautiful views of the city. Originally, commissioned by Eusebio Güell for Barcelona´s aristocracy, this space reflects Guadí´s passion for nature, colour and unique architectural form.

Places to visit in Barcelona - Parc Güell
  1. La Rambla

Stroll down Barcelona´s vibrant, street La Rambla and you´ll find live performances, artists, human statue art, a Miró mosaic and stalls. Spanish poet Federico García Lorca once commented, “It is the only street in the world I wish would never end” and, after a walk down this leafy, pedestrianised street, it’s easy to see why.Places to visit in Barcelona - La Rambla

  1. La Boqueria Market

Located off La Rambla is one of Europe´s most famous food markets. Whether you simply want to peruse the specialist food stalls or pull up a stool at one of the bars for a snack, this venue is definitely worth a visit.Places to go in Barcelona - La Boqueria Market

  1. Montjuïc Hill

Escape the crowds and head to Montjuïc hill. The area plays host to several museums such as the Joan Miró Foundation, the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and the castle, which is an old military fortress dating back to 1640.

Places to go in Barcelona -Montjuïc Hill
  1. The Magic Montjuïc Fountains

At night witness the Magic Fountain Show. This explosion of colour, water, movement and light set to music lives up to the name and provides a truly magical experience. By the way, this is one of our favourite places to visit in Barcelona, you will love it!

Places to go in Barcelona -Montjuïc Fountain
  1. Poble Espayol

Located near the Montjuic Fountains is Poble Espanyol (Spanish Village). The village, built in 1929, has 117 buildings resembling architecture from across Spain´s regions and offers a variety of shops, eateries, stalls and craft workshops. poble-espanyol-barcelona

  1. Camp Nou

For football fans, no visit to the city would be complete without a trip to Camp Nou, home of the legendary Barça. Even if you aren´t able to coincide your stay with a match, it is worth taking a tour of the impressive 99,354 seat stadium and museum. Camp nou

  1. Barri Gòtic

Finally, take time to meander the winding streets of the Gothic Quarter and admire the beautiful Roman and Medieval architecture. Dotted among impressive buildings such as the cathedral and iconic squares are plenty of bars and cafes for you to take time out and sample the local cuisine or simply sit back and soak up the atmosphere.

Barcelona Gothic quarter, Carrer del Bisbe

This  Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona, are a must during your visit, but also they are just an starter. Also remember we will be pleased to help you finding your apartment in Barcelona.

Also you can check the places to visit in Barcelona depending on the days  you are going to spend in the city:

Barcelona is waiting for your, are you ready for the trip to one of the most amazing cities in the world? Let’s go!

6 reasons to visit the neighbourhood of Gràcia

Gràcia is a neighbourhood that has become synonymous with Barcelona and it’s most likely that if this is your second or third trip to Barcelona, you’ve already fallen under its spell.

Located in the northern part of the city, a 20-minute walk from Plaça Catalunya along the city’s famous Passeig de Gràcia will take you into the heart of this charismatic district.

For those of you that are yet to discover its charm, we’ve put together this article explaining just why we love this area of Barcelona so much. From things to see and do, to its history and local traditions, this small guide will ensure that you won’t miss out on a thing.

Its village charm

Gràcia first emerged as a small rural community with three convents and a small population. It wasn’t until around the 19thcentury that Gràcia began to grow, becoming the most important village in the area thanks to its agricultural production.

In 1850 it was established as a municipality with 13,000 habitants, but it wasn’t until 1897, with almost 67,000 habitants, that it became part of Barcelona itself. Gràcia was flourishing yet it still lacked basic services and facilities. Over the years it has become the thriving hub it is today, boasting markets, cultural, sports and historical centres, medical services and schools.

Its cobbled streets and enchanting squares

Despite being located a stone’s throw away from the centre of Barcelona, the streets of Gràcia still conserve that charming allure often only found in small villages. 

Stroll along its streets lined with flowering trees, take a break in one of its many squares with a freshly brewed cup of coffee, or explore the Plaça de la Vila square with its 19th-century bell tower and Plaça de la Virreina with its beautiful stone church.

The Festes de Gràcia

Every August the streets of Gràcia come alive with locals and tourists alike. The Festa Major de Gràcia constitutes a weeklong celebration in which the streets of this charming area are decorated with recycled materials in every colour.

Each community of neighbours chooses a different theme for their street in a fun-filled family-friendly event that cannot be missed. Read more about this tradition in one of our past articles here.

Neighborhood of Gràcia

Alternative stores and independent boutiques

Gràcia is home to a plethora of shops that sell locally made products, ethical goods and gifts galore. With something for everyone, after exploring its streets, why not browse its second-hand book stores with faded armchairs, discover its designer boutiques with clothes designed in Barcelona or choose a custom-made piece of jewellery at one of its many workshops.

Casa Vicens

Opened to the public only a few years ago, many still don’t know that Gràcia boasts its very own piece of Gaudí. Constituting great architect’s first project, Gaudí was commissioned to build Casa Vicens as a summerhouse for the family of the same name. 

This wonderful building will surprise you with its range of influences from far and wide, its varied palette of colours and its spectacular design.

Neighborhood of Gràcia - Casa Vicens

The history beneath your feet at Plaça del Diamant

On first glance, Plaça del Diamant may appear to be just your normal square, however if you look a little closer you’ll discover the history it houses. 

Underneath the square is a bomb shelter that was built during the Spanish Civil War with a capacity for 200 people. Tickets are only €3 and must be booked in advance. 

Plaça del Diamant - Neighborhood of Gràcia

We hope you love the area as much as us! Let us know, what’s your favourite thing to do in Gràcia?

A Guide to Barcelona’s Civil War Bomb Shelters

Almost 82 years on, you’d never know that Barcelona was once the target of repeated and systematic airstrikes during the Spanish Civil War. 

It’s 16 March, 1938, and 41 hours of non-stop bombing is about to be unleashed on the city. Over three days, there were 670 deaths and 1,200 wounded during the Bombing of Barcelona by the Italian Aviazione Legionaria Italiana, upon the orders of General Franco and Mussolini. 

With attacks every three hours, the panic and terror was real. Luckily, over 1,400 bomb shelters were constructed in the city primarily by Barcelona’s very own citizens. Men were tasked with the construction, whilst women and children excavated the labyrinth of underground tunnels.

Despite over thousands of air-raid shelters being built, still many of Barcelona’s population struggled to find shelter. In these cases, the metro tunnels and stations were also used as makeshift shelters, with the station at Universitat being an example of this. 

We propose an alternative route that is often overlooked by tourists and locals. If you’re looking for route that will open your eyes to Barcelona’s history, this is it!

Refugi 307

One of the largest and most fascinating shelters in the city, Refugi (Shelter) 307 is located at the foot of Montjuïc mountain. It was the neighbourhood of Poble Sec that was one of the city’s most badly affected areas.

Get ready to discover over 400 metres of narrow tunnels with space for up to 2,000 people, plus a kitchen, bathroom facilities and even a pharmacy.

There are guided visits ever Sunday morning at 10.30 in English, 11.30 in Spanish and 12.30 in Catalan. Tickets are €3.50 and prior booking here is necessary.

Carrer Nou de la Rambla, 175

Refugi Antiaeri de la Plaça del Diamant

Around 90 shelters were built in the neighbourhood of Gràcia, with the Plaça del Diamant Air-raid Shelter being the most well known, with 250 metres of tunnels and capacity for around 200 people. 

It was discovered in 1992 during the construction of a power station in the square, thanks to which it was restored and opened to the public in 2006. 

Guided visits include a tour of the underground shelter with actors playing the roles of locals seeking shelter in order to survive the bombing. Visits in Spanish and English (upon request) are every second Sunday of the month and can be booked here

Plaça del Diamant

Refugi del Palau de les Heures

Despite being the smallest air-raid shelter on our tour, this one is, without a doubt, the best preserved. Discover its 40 metres of tunnels lit by the same lights that were used over 80 years ago, thanks to its restored electrics system.

Located at this stunning palace in the north of the city, the shelter was constructed specifically to protect the then President of the Government of Catalonia, Lluís Companys. Visits can be arranged by contacting the University of Barcelona, the current owners of the building. 

Passeig de la Vall d’Hebron, 171

Bomb Shelter Barcelona- Palau de les Heures

An additional tip to complete the tour: One of the most devastating events during the attack was when a bomb was dropped on the corner of the streets Balmes and Gran Vía, hitting a truck filled with TNT. Today, you can visit a cross in the place where it fell in memory of those killed and wounded during these days that Barcelona will never forget. 

Let yourself be amazed by these never-ending underground tunnels beneath the streets of Barcelona.

Barcelona is replete with history, don’t miss it on your next visit!

6 Curious Facts about the History of the Sagrada Família

Over the years, Barcelona has become synonymous with Gaudí’s Sagrada Família: its magnificent yet unfinished towers, its captivating sculpted exterior, its light-filled interior…

The Sagrada Família has been bringing people from far and wide to Barcelona for decades, yet what is it that fascinates visitors so?

Have you ever wondered why Gaudí built the Sagrada Familia? And when, after over 100 years, it will eventually be finished?

In this article we explain these six curious facts about the history and the construction of the Sagrada Família that are sure to make you even more curious about it.

Gaudí did not lay the Sagrada Família’s first stone

It was in 1881 that the Saint John Devotee Association (Asociación de devots de Sant Josep) bought a plot of land measuring 12,800 m2 on which to build the temple. However, it wasn’t until 19 March, 1882 that the first stone was laid – not by Gaudí – but by the architect Francisco de Paula del Villar y Lozano. In fact, Gaudí inherited the project from said architect in 1883 with a much more aspiring outlook than his predecessor.

Francisco de Paula del Villar y Lozano - Sagrada Família

Gaudí dedicated 43 years of his life to the Sagrada Família

As we have mentioned, Gaudí’s plan for what would be the Sagrada Família was highly ambitious. His original plans were for a temple with 5 naves, 3 facades, 18 towers. This would be, by far, his most ambitious project to date, and also the one he sought the most perfection in. From the year 1914 onwards, Gaudí stopped all other work and focused exclusively on the Sagrada Família.


Gaudí lived only to see the construction of the Nativity Façade

The Sagrada Família boasts three façades, each dedicated to a moment in the life of Christ: his birth, his suffering and resurrection and his eternal glory. It was in 1925 that he managed to finish the bell tower of the Nativity Façade, a mere year before his tragic death.

Gaudí knew that he would never see the Sagrada Família finished, therefore he left dozens of plans, sketches and instructions so it could be finished exactly how he had imagined. However, this information was tragically lost and burnt during the Spanish Civil War.

Nativity façade, 1899. Author: Aleu

The temple represents the life of Jesus and will be the tallest building in Barcelona

With the construction of the Sagrada Família, Gaudí’s wish was to represent the life of Jesus. The soon-to-be 18 towers will be dedicated to his disciples, the four Evangelists and the Virgin Mary. The tallest tower of all, scheduled to be finished in 2022, will be dedicated to Jesus Christ and topped by an impressive cross. 

With this, it will reach a total height of 172.5 metres, becoming the tallest building in the city of Barcelona. What’s more, it will also take the title for the tallest church in the world.

There are no straight lines in its architecture

In the entirety of Gaudí’s magnificent temple there is not one straight line. This masterpiece is an imitation of nature at its purest – from columns that emulate trees to an abundance of diverse flora and fauna. It was Gaudí himself who said: “The straight line belongs to men, the curved one to God.”

It will be finished in 2026 to coincide with the centenary of Gaudí’s death

A mere 144 years since it was started, the Sagrada Família is scheduled to be finished in the year 2026, marking one hundred years after Gaudí’s death in 1926. However, just because the construction is finished doesn’t mean that the temple itself is finished. There is still many a decorative element to add!

This date will be considered even more special if Gaudí obtains sainthood from the Catholic Church, the proposal for which was initiated in 2000 by an association of his devotees.

So, whether your visiting the Sagrada Família for the first or umpteenth time, we hope these interesting facts will open your eyes to the history behind it. 

Day Trip to Dalí Museum from Barcelona

North of Barcelona lies the sleepy town of Figueres. On first glance it may not seem that different to other Catalan towns, with its quaint squares and local cafés and restaurants. Yet this seemingly normal town is the birthplace of the master of surrealism: Salvador Dalí.

For visitors to Barcelona who wish to escape the crowds and delve into Dalí’s sublime mind, we’ve put together this small guide for a surreal day-trip for the whole family.

History of the Dalí Theatre-Museum

Dalí travelled the world as an artist, conquering Spain, France and the US, yet Figueres always held a place in his heart. It was this reason that he chose it as the home for his museum.

It was in 1974 that the town’s old theatre – which was destroyed in the Civil War – was reopened to showcase a large selection of his art. Dalí wanted a place where visitors could immerse themselves in his diverse range of work. He supervised the entire design and reconstruction to ensure his wishes were fulfilled, staying at a nearby hotel.

The result, as you will discover, was a flamboyant, indescribable space that goes beyond what any other local artist achieved. This is Dalí’s legacy as a surrealist and will surely be the most original and unique museum you ever visit.

Visiting the Dalí Theatre-Museum

From the famous eggs perched on the museum’s rooftops to Dalí’s very own black Cadillac where it rains, Dalí’s aim was to astound, amaze and amuse. 

Every room and every piece proposes a question to the visitor and we are sure you will come up with your own conclusions about Dalí’s works. Discover the Mae West room designed with the actress’s facial features. Look out for pieces dedicated to Gala, the love of his life. Stare in wonder at the Oscar statues.

A ticket to the museum cost €14 for adults and are free for under 8s. We’d recommend saving 2–3 hours for the visit to ensure you make the most of this surreal experience. Museum opening times vary depending on the season (peak season 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.) and exhibition rooms close around 15 minutes before the actual closing time. There is also the option to book a guided tour with an expert guide, who will share stories about Dalí’s life, the inspiration behind his theatre-museum and its most eccentric and bizarre pieces.

Exploring Figueres

Aside from the town’s top attraction, Figueres itself is also worth exploring. Look a little closer and you might be surprised – there is a little bit of Dalí to be found on every street corner. If you decide to stay a little longer after your surreal trip, take a wander through its cobbled streets and discover its emblematic churches, the Plaça de Gala y Salvador Dalí and the Rambla de Figueres, and the Toy Museum of Catalonia (where you will get 30% discount on entry with your Dalí theatre-museum ticket). You won’t be disappointed!

How to get there

Figueres is located close to the city of Girona and around 140 km away from Barcelona.

Getting there by public transport is relatively easy. Take the train to the Figueres-Vilafant railway station from Barcelona Sants station and, in a short journey of 55 minutes, you’ll be in Figueres. Return tickets start from €30 depending on the train service (Ave or Avant). The museum is about 10 minutes walking distance from the station.

If you prefer to take the bus, Sagalés coaches offer services from Barcelona El Prat Airport or Barcelona Estació del Nord, which take just under 3 hours. Tickets cost €20 each way and you’ll take either bus 602 or 603.

If you’ve hired a car, take motorway AP-7 towards France and take the Figueres exit. Then head towards Figueres city centre.

Check out the opening times and ticket prices, book online and find out all you need before you visit the Dalí theatre-museum here.

The Dalí museum is a flamboyant and spectacular experience not to be missed!

9 Things To Do in Ciutat Vella – Barcelona Travel Guide

Barcelona’s Ciutat Vella — ‘old town’ in Catalan — is overflowing with rich cultural and historical heritage. 

The streets of the Ciutat Vella tell the story of the city’s origins right up to the present day: from ancient monuments and historic buildings, to bars and restaurants, alternative boutiques, and sun-drenched squares buzzing with tourists and locals alike.

With so much on offer, it’s no wonder this area is one of the city’s most popular tourist hotspots.

The Ciutat Vella of Barcelona, once surrounded by medieval city walls, covers four of Barcelona’s main neighbourhoods — El Raval, El Barri Gòtic, El Born and La Barceloneta. With such a sprawling area to explore, it’s difficult to know where to start. To make sure you don’t miss out, we’ve put together a list of the top nine things to do in Barcelona’s Ciutat Vella.

1. La Rambla

No trip to Barcelona is complete without a visit to the city’s most emblematic street: La Rambla. 

Take a stroll down this lively promenade, which joins the iconic Plaça Catalunya with the Columbus Monument, and discover historical monuments, flower stalls, live statues, outdoor restaurants, and much more.

2. El Mercat de la Boqueria 

Located on La Rambla, this is a world-famous food market brimming with historic tradition. With Catalan modernist-style architecture, la Boqueria is the link between Barcelona’s past and present.

Take in the colours and aromas of fresh fruit and vegetables, seafood, meats and spices, or grab a seat at one of the stalls and order tapas of seafood or cured Iberian meats.

3.Gran Teatre del Liceu

Keep walking on La Rambla and you’ll stumble across another of Barcelona’s iconic cultural symbols, El Liceu.

Since its opening in 1847, this opera house has heard the greatest tenors and sopranos of the times. It can be enjoyed from the outside, on a guided tour, or by reserving tickets for the next show. Check out what’s currently on here.

4. Plaça Reial

Just a few metres from La Rambla, you’ll find Plaça Reial. Seek shade below its towering palm trees and take in the stunning central fountain. Don’t leave without snapping a photo of the square’s exquisite lampposts, which are some of Gaudí’s earliest works.

5. Museu d’Història de Barcelona (MUHBA)

If you’re curious about the origins of Barcelona, visit the Museum of the History of Barcelona (MUHBA) and take a journey through time. Wander the Roman streets of Barcino and discover medieval ruins, most of which are located below Plaça del Rei.

6. Cathedral of Barcelona

With its unique Catalan gothic style, the cathedral of Barcelona is not to be passed by. Let yourself be amazed by its numerous gargoyles and towering spires found right in the heart of the city’s Gothic Quarter. 

7. Plaça de Sant Felip Neri

Escape the crowds and seek peace and tranquillity in the quaint and romantic square of Sant Felip Neri. Yet what is unique about this square is its tragic history. The damage to the church’s walls after a bombing during the Spanish Civil War is still visible to this day.

8. Palau de la Música Catalana

The Catalan Concert Hall can be described as no other than the city’s jewel of modernism. Declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, this exquisite form of modernist architecture will not disappoint. 

9. Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)

Enter the creative world of Barcelona’s Museum of Modern Art and discover an array of thought-provoking exhibitions by both local and international artists or simply marvel at this outstanding contemporary structure. What’s more, entry is free every Saturday from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Delve a little deeper into the history of this beautiful city and discover Barcelona’s most fascinating side. With so much to choose from, Barcelona certainly has a little something to offer everyone. 

8 things to do in El Born – The trendiest neighbourhood in Barcelona 

El Born is known to be one of the trendiest neighbourhoods of Barcelona. In the old town, there’s plenty to explore as you wander through the narrow cobbled streets, lined with historical buildings and fashionable boutiques. Pop into an art gallery or relax in the park, with our list of the eight best things to do in El Born you won’t miss out on anything.

1. Santa Maria del Mar

One of the most breathtaking buildings in El Born is Santa Maria del Mar. A cathedral built between 1329 and 1383, the Catalan Gothic style is truly a beautiful sight to behold. For those interested in the history, there’s even a fictional serie detailing the building of the cathedral and the lives of the people at the time. 

things to do in el born - Santa Maria del Mar Barcelona

2. Parc de la Ciutadella

One of the favourite parks for locals to hang out in, Parc de la Ciutadella has much to offer. On a sunny day there are plenty of grassy spots to set up camp and have a picnic or just relax in the sun. As well as that, the park houses the city zoo, the Palau del Parlament de Catalunya, a small lake on which you can go rowing, museums, and a large and beautiful fountain designed by Josep Fontserè. However, it’s important to be careful when hanging out there as many pickpockets operate in the area. Check out our top tips on how to avoid being pickpocketed here.

things to do in el Born - Parc de la Ciutadella

3. Arc de Triomf

Just above Parc de la Ciutadella you will find Barcelona’s very own Arc de Triomf. Built by architect Josep Vilaseca i Casanovas in 1888, the Arc de Triomf was originally made as the main access gate for the 1888 Barcelona World Fair. Along with being a stunning piece of architecture, the Arc the Triomf is also a great place to take a picture underneath for a memorable shot from your Barcelona trip.

Arc de Triomf - things to see in Barcelona

4. Picasso Museum

No trip to Barcelona is complete without taking in some art by one of the many famous artists who have called Barcelona their home, with one of the most renowned being Pablo Picasso. Housed in five adjoining medieval palaces, the museum has the world’s most extensive collections of the famous 20th century Spanish artist’s works, along with various temporary exhibitions throughout the year. 

picasso-museum-barcelona

5. Born Cultural Centre

Walk up Passatge Mercantil and you can’t help but notice the looming building of Mercat del Born, built in 1873 and showing off the Modernisme catalan style. The inside is just as intriguing as the beautiful outside, as it houses the Born Cultural Centre. Underneath the building an archaeological site was found, revealing the ruins of streets and houses in Barcelona from the 1700’s. Stop by here to view them and learn more about the history of the wonderful city of Barcelona.

Born cultural centre - things to do in El born

6. Fossar de les Moreres

Whilst you are visiting Santa Maria del Mar, make sure to also check out Fossar de les Moreres, which lies adjacent to it. The Fossar de les Moreres is a memorial square dedicated to those defenders of the city who dies during the Siege of Barcelona at the end of the War of the Spanish Succession in 1714. The memorial features a torch with a flame that never goes out, as a touching tribute to those who have fallen. 

Fossar de les Moreres - Things to see in El born

7. Museu de la Xocolata

For those with a sweet tooth, there’s nowhere better to visit than the Museu de la Xocolata in el Born. Here you can find out all about the history and the chocolate making process, as well as seeing various well-known sites from around the city, created in chocolate form: a feast for the eyes and the tummy!

El born - Museu de la xocolata

8. Casa Llotja de Mar

As the name suggests, you will find Casa Llotja de Mar located towards the sea front. Built during the 14th century, the beautiful architecture is another representative of the Catalan Gothic style. Having many different purposes over the years, the building began life as the seat for the Consolat de Mar, now serving purpose as the Official Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Shipping of Barcelona.

With these sites in mind, your exploration of one of the most beautiful and historical districts of Barcelona will allow you to discover the city’s hidden secrets. 

Movies and series set in Barcelona you must watch

The beautiful backdrop and varied history of Barcelona make it the perfect setting and location for movies and tv series. From serious historical based dramas, to romantic love stories and even comedies, check out our favourite movies and tv series set in Barcelona to get a taste of the beautiful and vibrant city.

Movies set in Barcelona

L’auberge espagnole

Barcelona is an ever-popular place for students doing their Erasmus, or year abroad studies, and L’auberge espagnole perfectly encapsulates that. Based on a French student who finds himself in a house of eclectic international students whilst doing his year abroad in the often-diverse city of Barcelona, this film really highlights the hedonistic side of the city that can be enjoyed. Capturing the Barcelona from a certain period of time, this French-Spanish film is not one to be missed, especially for those who studied in Barcelona themselves as a trip down memory lane.

Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Perhaps the most famous film set in Barcelona, featuring stars Scarlett Johansson, Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem, Vicky Cristina Barcelona follows the journey of two Americans visiting Barcelona for the first time, where they meet and fall for some fiery Spanish characters. As much a love story about people, this film is a love story about Barcelona, showing off the very best of the city.

Todo Sobre mi Madre

Directed by Pedro Almodóvar, one of Spain’s most famous directors, Todo Sobre mi Madre, literally translates as All About My Mother. This Academy Award winning film is able to explore deep and complex issues, such as AIDS, existentialism and transsexuality, through its cinematic prowess, and its setting in Barcelona is perhaps an ode to the city’s often progressive and liberal nature.

Salvador (Puig Antich)

A true story, based on the above named, gives the spectator an insight into the history of Barcelona, during the time of the Franco regime. This is the sad tale of a man who fought for the independence of Catalunya, through anarchist movements and depicts the time he spent on death row as a result. Salvador Puig Antich is still a symbol of independence and a household name in Catalunya, as one of Franco’s last victims. 

Pa Negre

Another sad film depicting life in Catalunya in the times of Franco, Pa Negre, meaning black bread, is the story of a young boy who lives in the Catalan country-side in the harsh post-war times. An emotional tale, that explores the intricacies of human nature, as well as the history of Catalunya and Spain, this is a must watch for those for those interested in politics and history. 

Cheetah Girls 2

For anyone who was into Disney as a child this movie might ring a bell. A talented teen quartet, led up by Raven-Symoné, move to Barcelona to follow their dreams of pop superstardom. A light film featuring musical numbers and suitable for children, Cheetah Girls 2 highlights some of Barcelona’s most famous sites as they explore all the city has to offer. In fact, as the cast and crew were looking for some luxurious accommodation to stay in during filming, they chose to stay in some of bizFlats finest apartments, as the best base to relax and have access to the city. 

TV Series set in Barcelona

La Catedral del Mar

For those interested in history, La Catedral del Mar (Cathedral of the Sea) takes the viewer back to medieval Barcelona, and is the tale of the construction of Santa Maria del Mar, which still stands. Set in Barcelona, the series follows the life of Arnau Estanyol, the son of a fugitive serf and one of the cathedral’s stone workers.

Where to watch: Netflix (outside Spain), Antena 3

Cites

A light comedy-drama, Cites (an adaptation of the UK series Dates) shows what contemporary life in the city of Barcelona is like for young adults, searching for love and companionship.  Following the experiences of 24 different strangers who met on the internet and then meet face-to-face, Cites cleverly intertwines the lives of these strangers to create a compelling drama focusing on the ups and downs of human relationships and the struggle of looking for love in the modern age.The characters visit a great selection of venues such as parks, restaurants and bars which any visitor can find in the city.

Where to watch: TV3, Amazon Prime Video

Merlí

A good one if you want to practice your Catalan (although don’t worry, it is also possible to find it with subtitles), Merlí has seen international success, with the possibility to even find it on Netflix. Set in a high-school in Barcelona, each episode is themed after a famous philosopher or school of thought, with the series bringing philosophy to the public in an interesting and accessible way.

Where to watch: TV3 (seasons 1-3), Netflix (seasons 1 and 2)

So next time you’re looking for something to watch, why not try out one of these great movies or tv series. It might even help you get inspiration for your next trip to the wonderful city of Barcelona.