What to do in Barcelona in June – Discover the best plans

Wondering what to do in Barcelona in June? We’ve got you covered with the best plans in this article. The summer is here and you’ll be delighted to know, after two years of pandemic, it’s packed with amazing plans for all tastes, ages and budgets. Find out how to make the most of the longest days of the year!

From outdoor events, traditional festivities, art exhibitions, and – above all – an eclectic mix of music festivals and concerts, there’s something for everyone who doesn’t know what to do in Barcelona in June.

So here’s our list of what to do in Barcelona in June with our top 8 plans!

Barcelona in June - Primavera Sound
Barcelona in June – Primavera Sound

Primavera Sound ­– 1 June to 12 June

Parc del Fòrum, Carrer de la Pau, 12

Kicking off the month is Primavera Sound. After being postponed for two years, Barcelona’s biggest festival is back with two weeks packed full of the best music. Expect innovative, inspiring and ground-breaking beats signed by Dua Lipa, Tame Impala, The Strokes, Gorillaz, Massive Attack, Beck, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and many more big names. Parc del Fòrum will come to life with buzzing live performances.

Fito & Fitipaldis – 4 June

Palau Sant Jordi, Passeig Olímpic, 5-7, 08038

The amazing Fito and his band take to the stage at Barcelona’s Palau Sant Jordi, performing songs from their latest album alongside some of their biggest hits. An unmissable date for fans and a must on our list of what to do in Barcelona in June.

Festival dels Jardins de Pedralbes – 7 June to 24 July

Avinguda Diagonal, 686, 08034

We couldn’t not include one of the most-awaited music events of the year on our list of what to do in Barcelona in June. This festival here with big names in jazz, pop, rock and more, in the most magical setting that is the Pedralbes gardens. Kicked off on the 7 June by James Blunt, this year will feature live performances by Simply Red, Crystal Fighters, Madness and more. See you there!

Sónar – June 16 to June 18

Avda. Reina Maria Cristina, s/n, 08004 and Av. Joan Carles I, 64, 08908

A ground-breaking electronic music festival that since 1994 has been bringing together creativity, business, technology and music in Barcelona. With nearly 200 activities, this is not your average music festival and is among the best plans for what to do in Barcelona in June. Sónar Day will take place at Fira de Montjuïc from 1pm to midnight, and Sónar Night at Fira Gran Via l’Hospitalet from early evening to the early hours. Highlights include The Chemical Brothers, The Blaze, Bonobo and Barcelona’s own Maria Arnal i Marcel Bagés.

Verbena de Sant Joan – night of 23 June

As the month comes to a close, if you’re still wondering what to do in Barcelona in June, Sant Joan is a celebration you can’t miss. The night of the 23rd–24th June is the shortest night of the year, and everyone in Barcelona gets together to celebrate the magical summer solstice. Expect fireworks, bonfires, and beach parties until dawn. Don’t forget that the 24th is a bank holiday and many shops and stores will be closed.

Gay Pride Barcelona – 23 to 26 June

After two years without Pride in the city, the much-awaited extravagant, colourful and eclectic parade will take place on Saturday 25th at 5pm, starting at Placa Universitat and ending at Passeig Lluís Companys. This year’s incredible line-up will be released shortly, so keep your eyes peeled for fabulous events taking place throughout the city. Pride 2022 features top on our list of what to do in Barcelona in June!

World of Banksy – throughout June until December 2022

Espai Trafalgar, Carrer de Trafalgar, 34, 08010

After its success Paris, this exhibition with work by the mysterious Bristol-born urban artists hits Barcelona. Featuring some of the renowned street artist’s most popular pieces, including Girl With Balloon and Girl Frisking Soldier.

Festa Major del Casc Antic – end of June

The central old quarter, known as the Casc Antic in Catalan, celebrates a week of festivities every year at the end of June. Although this year’s date has yet to be confirmed, expect correfocs (fire runs), giants and live music in Barcelona’s most central and – arguably most beautiful – neighbourhood steeped in history.

We hope you enjoy our list of what to do in Barcelona in June! With tonnes of things to see and do, you’re sure to make the most of your stay in this fun-packed city.

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Barcelona carnival 2022 – Featured Activities

Barcelona Carnival 2022 is here and it promises to be one of the biggest and best ever! Despite being the second carnival during the pandemic, this year Barcelona will host an array of fantastic and flamboyant activities brimming with colour and excitement from 24 February to 2 March.

Barcelona Carnival 2022 will bring freedom and fantasy to all districts in Barcelona, so don’t miss our complete guide to a range of featured activities for young and old!

Barcelona Carnival 2022
Barcelona Carnival 2022

Barcelona Carnival 2022: Thursday, 24 March

Just like every year, Barcelona Carnival 2022 will be kicked off on Jueves Lardero, or Fat Thursday. Traditionally, this last Thursday before Lent marks the start of the celebrations and feasting before the upcoming period of fasting.

El Arribo – 5:45 pm

This year, El Arribo opening ceremony will take place on La Rambla in honour of all those who work in kiosks, and will be presented by King Tòtil and Queen Belluga.

This magical parade will end at Palau de la Virreina to hold the much-awaited Taronjada. This rebellious event dates back to 1333 when the Council of One Hundred prohibited the throwing of oranges, and is celebrated this Barcelona Carnival 2022 with the throwing of orange confetti and fireworks.

Culinary events

Similar to past years, Barcelona Carnival 2022 will welcome an array of gastronomic events on Dijous Llarder, from omelette competitions, coca bread tasting events, show cooking, and much more.

Highlights include the truita tasting and concert at 6 pm at the Centre Cívic Font de la Guatlla, the Centre Cívic el Coll’s Fat Thursday for the elderly at 5 pm and La Violeta Omelette contest at 8pm. What’s more, anyone can take part in the ninth edition of Entruita’t’. Find more information about this online omelette competition here.

And whilst we’re on the topic of food, don’t forget to try the traditional coca de llardons: this pork crackling bread topped with pine nuts is one of the most typical sweet-and-savoury Barcelona Carnival 2022 treats.

Barcelona Carnival 2022: Friday, 25 March – Saturday, 26 March

On the 25th, Barcelona Carnival 2022 brings us a plethora of parades, or Rúas. With 30 in total around the entire city, you’ll be spoiled for choice. This year, Barcelona Carnival 2022 will bring the city’s Old Quarter to life with a special event for kids at 5.45 pm, with two colourful parades starting from Plaça de la Mercè and Plaça de la Acadèmia respectively, and ending in Plaça del Rei.

Highlights on Saturday 25th include the ‘Carnavalassu adult’ (5 pm) with a parade starting at Sant Felip Neri and ending at Avinguda Francesc Cambó. Gràcia’s main parade will start at 6 pm in the Jardinets de Gràcia and will end at Plaça de la Vila. And in Les Corts things get started at 4:30 pm in La Plaça Comas, and will finish with a chocolate event and entertainment for kids in Plaça de Can Rosés.

Unlike in other towns and cities, which save the best for Sunday, Barcelona on Saturday will be brimming with a range of parades, pageants and processions in addition to workshops, tasting events, costume parties and masquerades. There are so many events to choose from in fact, we recommend checking out the official city council website to find out what’s going on in your area.

Barcelona Carnival 2022: Wednesday, 2 March

In Christian cultures around the world, Ash Wednesday celebrates the start of Lent. Bringing Barcelona Carnival 2022 to a close will be the traditional “Burial of the Sardine”. This ritual marks the seven days of decadence and celebration and gives way to a time of sobriety and abstinence. This procession symbolises a burial of the past to make way for the new and is an event that cannot be missed.

This Barcelona Carnival 2022, there are eight different burials to choose from in the city, each with its own peculiar traditions. Catch parodies of funeral processions, the burning of the King of Carnival and community meals of… you guessed it – sardines!

Some highlights include the Centre Cívic de Guinardó’s New Orleans-style sardine burial at 5:30 pm and the burial of the King of Carnival at 7 pm at the Cotxeres de Sants auditorium, to bring this magical time to a close.

But wait… it’s not over yet! La Barceloneta will celebrate its very own Carnival the following weekend. So get ready for more fun and frivolities!

From bizFlats, we wish you a very merry Barcelona Carnival 2022!

Barcelona carnival poster

The oldest Barcelona Christmas Market, Fira de Santa LLúcia

A visit to a Barcelona Christmas Market is the best way to sample the city’s Christmas Spirit.  The oldest one in the city is the Fira de Santa Llúcia – situated in front of the Barcelona Cathedral at Avinguda de la Catedral.  It’s right in the centre of city and full of seasonal hustle and bustle, while brimming with traditional Catalan Christmas trinkets and decorations for house and garden.


Barcelona Christmas Market
This Barcelona Christmas Market was created to celebrate the feast day of Santa LLúcia on December 13, but has now grown into a major part of the city’s Yuletide celebrations.  This year, it runs from November 26, through to December 23.

What to find in this Barcelona Christmas Market

There are over 250 stalls which are arranged in 4 distinct sections; Nativity Scenes & Figurines, Greenery and Plants (which includes fresh mistletoe for romantic visitors), Crafts & Fabrics and Traditional Musical Instruments.

It still is a very traditional Christmas market, but over time the Fira de Santa Llúcia has grown and grown.  Today, it supplies additional products like toys and games for the children as well as decorations, hand crafted gifts and artisan products.  Expect to see the traditional specialty on display, turrón, a baked cake of nougat made of honey, egg white and sugar with toasted almonds, or nuts with a rice paper coating. Buy two, so at least one gets to make its way home with you!

Among the many religious and more modern gift ideas, a few of the more traditional decorations items are on display and for sale.  However, no Barcelona Christmas market would be complete without the infamous Caganer figures, a key fixture for the Catalan nativity scene, referred to as ‘El Pesebre’.  This normally depicts a peasant defecating and the Caganer’s exact origins are pretty much unknown.  But there he is, often hidden away in the far corner of a nativity scene, typically nowhere near the manger or main characters.  The Catalan tradition is to have children find the hidden figure.

El Caganer - Barcelona Christmas Market

El Tió de Nadal

This leads to another fascinating tradition… the Tió de Nadal or Christmas log.  The children will recite a famous song about el Tió de Nadal and before beating the Tió all the kids have to leave the room to pray, asking for the Tió to deliver a lot of presents.  This makes the perfect excuse for the relatives to do the trick and put the presents under a blanket behind the Tió while the kids are praying.  The Tió is not for large gifts, as they are brought by the three Kings on January 6th, but they are used more for smaller, communal gifts, treats and dried fruits that are shared by the whole brood… all of which are on offer at this Barcelona Christmas market.

Tió de Nadal - Fira de Santa Llúcia

How to get to Fira de Santa Llúcia

Due to the traffic jams during christmas holidays, we recommend you to get there using public transport. If you take the Metro, you can stop in Jaume I station (L4) and walk 3 minutes until the Cathedral.

Also you can stop in Plaça Catalunya, go down Portal de l’Àngel and have a walk in the main shopping street of the city until you get to the Cathedral (10 minutes walking)

The best way to discover this Barcelona’s Christmas Market is to rent a beautiful apartment in the city centre close by all the Christmas action, then please see our apartments in Barcelona here and book your festive vacation in Barcelona with us.

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Sant Jordi 2020 – When and how will be celebrated?

Books and Roses

A new date has been announced for Sant Jordi 2020. This year, given the current circumstances, the official Booksellers Guild and Florists Guild of Catalonia have decided to postpone this eagerly awaited event on the Catalan calendar in line with Government guidelines. 

Sant Jordi – which is normally celebrated every year on World Book Day on 23rdApril – will be postponed to 23rdJuly with the safety of all in mind. All events, workshops and readings will also be postponed to this date, in addition to the Sant Jordi discount on books.

The proposal of the Booksellers Guild and Florists Guild foresees limited stops and pre-organized book signings to comply with security measures and hygiene. The proposal for Sant Jordi 2020 is pending approval by Procicat and the corresponding municipalities. In Barcelona has been planned to install a thousand stops, for which will be needed the approval of the Municipal Events Commission.

In addition, queues and movement between stops will be regulated, for which a maximum space will be set. All visitors must come with a mask, respect the distance of 1.5 meters and follow the instructions on safety and hygiene given by the organization.

Sant Jordi 2020

Why is Sant Jordi so important?

If you’ve had the chance to experience this day in Barcelona before, you’ll understand just how important it is. It is a day on which the young and old alike take to the streets to buy their loved ones a gift. All the main streets of Barcelona are lined with bookstalls and on every corner you’ll find rose sellers selling single roses. 

The origin of this literary celebration is a popular story in many cultures and is based on the story of Sant Jordi and the dragon. To read more about its history and how it’s celebrated, check out our Sant Jordi article here.

Sant Jordi 2020 will definitely take place in a very different way than usual

Sant Jordi 2020 at home

Lovers of Sant Jordi don’t despair! If you don’t want to walk around to visit the different bookstalls on the 23rd of July, you can also celebrate Sant Jordi 2020 from home!

This year, Casa Batlló is encouraging the citizens of Barcelona to bring the magic of Sant Jordi into their own homes. Every year on this day, this beautiful Gaudí house inspired by the mythical dragon is normally adorned with hundreds of red roses. 

So, be sure to follow the #SantJordialBalcons (SantJordiBalconies) initiative on social media and join in from home by decorating your own balcony with pictures, roses, dragons and book covers. Avoid boredom by getting creative and painting, drawing and making together with your loved ones.

Sant Jordi at home

Remember to upload your pictures to social media with the above hash tag. The ten publications with the most likes will win a collection of children’s books. 

Supporting local booksellers

Additionally, don’t forget that it’s still possible to buy books online from local sellers. Thanks to the platform “LlibreriesObertes” (OpenBookstores), you can order your books and pick them up once the lockdown regulations have been lifted.

The initiative was launched in order to support these local publishers and bookstores during these times of hardship. With the objective of selling 30,000 books, these advance sales will ensure the survival of the city’s bookstores.

Sant Jordi 2020 - books

Check out the website here and help support Barcelona’s bookstores: https://llibreriesobertes.cat

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How will you be celebrating Sant Jordi 2020 this year? Let us know!

8 essential Catalan phrases you can’t visit Barcelona without knowing

Do you want to learn basic Catalan phrases for your next trip to Barcelona? You may be thinking that you can just get by with Spanish or English, but if you really want to impress and get to know the locals, these essential Catalan words and phrases will go a long way.

Why not use your time at home over the next few weeks to brush up your language skills in one of Spain’s official languages and add some of these useful phrases to your repertoire.

Whether you’re greeting a friend, ordering food or buying souvenirs, we’ve definitely got you covered. Preparats (ready)? 

CATALAN PHRASES

Basic Catalan phrases to use in your next trip

Bon dia (bon dee-ah) / Bona tarda (bon-ah tard-ah)

Good morning / Good afternoon 

When strolling along the streets of Barcelona, you’ll definitely hear this phrase used again and again. Put a smile on any local’s face with this common greeting (used more than “hola”). Remember, the afternoon starts around lunchtime and lasts all the way until just before dinnertime – which is around 10 pm – so don’t be surprised if someone greets you with “bona tarda” at 8 pm!

Si us plau (see oos plow)  & Merci (mehr-see) 

Please & thank you

If you’ve visited Barcelona several times and are familiar with the Catalan language, you’ll know has some similarities with the French language. These two phrases will go a long way during your stay, so please use them abundantly. 

With “merci”, remember to put emphasis on the first syllable “meras opposed to on the final syllable, like in French.

Note: “merci” is used a lot more than “gràcies” but please take into account is is colloquial.

De res (deh res) 

You’re welcome

If it makes it a little easier to remember, you can literally translate this phrase as “of nothing”. What’s more it’s just like the French (de rien) and Spanish (de nada).

Adéu (ah-deh-ou)

Goodbye

Whether your waving farewell to your new Catalan friends or simply saying goodbye to the owners of your new favourite restaurant, be sure to do so with a friendly and heartfelt “adéu.

Bon profit! (bon pro-feet) 

Bon appetit!

The Catalans are a very courteous bunch, so don’t be surprised if you get total strangers declaring “bon profit” as you tuck into your meal at a local restaurant. 

Quant costa – ? (kwant coh-sta)

How much is –?

The chances are during your stay at some point you’ll be buying souvenirs, tickets for the museum or a little treat for yourself. Use this phrase and simply add whatever it is you’re asking for or point and say “això” (ay-shoh), which means “this”.

El compte, si us plau (el com-teh see oos plow)

The bill, please.

Show off your language skills and impress your friends by asking for the bill in Catalan at the end of your meal. If you really want to blend in with the locals, try switching this phrase for “Em cobres” (um cub-ras), which literally means “charge me” and is used much more frequently by Catalans.

Parles anglès? (par-las ang-less)?

Do you speak English?

Whilst the majority of locals speak very good English, this polite question is sure to make you many a new friend in the city. Not only will they be impressed with your Catalan skills, they’ll be grateful you are trying to learn their language.

While we’ve got you covered for the basics, we encourage you to download a learning app or grab a dusty phrase book from your shelf and get studying for your next trip to Barcelona! 

See you soon! Ens veiem aviat!

Some more bites

P.S. Below is a small list of other some additional vocabulary and Catalan phrases we’re sure will come in useful!

CATALAN  ENGLISH 
Bona nit  Good night 
Perdó  Sorry 
Esmorzar  Breakfast 
Dinar  Lunch
Sopar  Dinner
Esquerra  Left 
Dreta  Right 
Obert  Open 
Carrer  Street 
Plaça  Square 

We hope you liked these brief guide of basic Catalan Phrases! Ens veiem in Barcelona aviat! (See you soon in Barcelona) 🙂

Also you may find interesting to learn more about Catalan culture, traditions and gastronomy in the following articles:


Songs about Barcelona

7 Barcelona songs that will make you fall in love with the city

Unmissable Barcelona songs? Whether you’re creating a playlist for your next trip to Barcelona or simply missing the Catalan capital, these songs about the magical city will inspire you to dance around and sing about your love for it.

Barcelona has been visited by many a creative, singer and songwriter over the years on the quest for inspiration. Many have found it in its charming cobbled streets, quirky bars and buzzing cultural scene.

So, what are you waiting for? Turn the volume up and don’t be afraid to sing along!

Barcelona songs

7 Barcelona songs that you will love

1. La Rumba de Barcelona – Manu Chao (2002)

Rumored to own a bar in Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, Manu Chao is a French-Spanish singer who performs in a large variety of languages. His song about Barcelona will take you straight to the heart of the city with its catchy beat and lyrics. We guarantee you’ll be singing it as you walk down Las Ramblas

2. Barcelona – Giulia y Los Tellarini (Vicky Cristina Barcelona Soundtrack) (2008)

The Catalan-Italian band Giulia y Los Tellarini never dreamed their song ‘Barcelona’ would be chosen for Woody Allen’s film Vicky Cristina Barcelona. This song was featured on the trailer for the film. 

As the song lyrics go “Barcelona is powerful” and we couldn’t agree more!

3. Barcelona – Freddie Mercury and Monsterrat Caballé (1988)

Barcelona is the title song of the audacious collaborative album by Freddie Mercury and soprano Montserrat Caballé. With Mercury’s second solo album he fulfilled one of his life-long dreams to combine opera and rock.

The Queen lead singer put his life and soul into his work and unfortunately died several months before being able to open the Barcelona 1992 Olympics with this Barcelona song.

4. Barcelona Hechicera – Peret (1992)

This catchy rhythmic song is dedicated to the city of Barcelona and its main sights. It’s one of our favourites and always puts us in a good mood.

It was written in 1992 for the closing ceremony of the Barcelona Olympic Games to the tune of Catalan Rumba. This music genre was developed in the gypsy community of the city in the 60s, influenced by Flamenco Rumba, Cuban rhythms and rock and roll.

5. Barcelona – Ed Sheeran (2017)

The young 25-year-old singer and songwriter Ed Sheeran penned this song out of love for his dear Barcelona. This upbeat tune will certainly get you in the mood to visit the Sagrada Familia and Las Ramblas. The singer decided to include some of the Spanish words he knew, despite them not making much sense, to capture his perspective of the city.

6. George Ezra – Barcelona (2014)

The song Barcelona is taken from George Ezra’s album ‘Wanted On Voyage’.

The story goes that George was struggling to deal with his rapid fame and needed to sort some things out in his head. His answer was to move in with a stranger in Barcelona and spend some time reconnecting with the real world. Thus this song was born!

7. We’re from Barcelona – I’m from Barcelona (2006)

The name of this Swedish group is funnily enough “I’m from Barcelona”. It’s said that the band’s inspiration for their name and this song came from Manuel the waiter in Monty Python’s Faulty Towers.

The video features all 29 band members – we bet you can’t resist singing along with them!

So, there you have it. Enjoy these Barcelona songs! They will make you dance and feel the Barcelona vibes for sure!

To know more about Barcelona and start planning your trip, you can check the places to visit in Barcelona depending on the days  you are going to spend in the city:

So push the play button and start doing your suitcase, we are waiting for you!

Find your perfect apartment in Barcelona here

6 great reasons to visit the neighbourhood of Gràcia

The neighbourhood of Gràcia has become synonymous with Barcelona and it’s most likely that if this is your second or third trip to Barcelona, you’ve already fallen under its spell.

Located in the northern part of the city, a 20-minute walk from Plaça Catalunya along the city’s famous Passeig de Gràcia will take you into the heart of this charismatic district.

For those of you that are yet to discover its charm, we’ve put together this article explaining just why we love the neighbourhood of Gràcia area of Barcelona so much. From things to see and do, to its history and local traditions, this small guide will ensure that you won’t miss out on a thing.

A plaza in the Barcelona neighbourhood of Gràcia

Its village charm

Gràcia first emerged as a small rural community with three convents and a small population. It wasn’t until around the 19thcentury that Gràcia began to grow, becoming the most important village in the area thanks to its agricultural production.

In 1850 it was established as a municipality with 13,000 habitants, but it wasn’t until 1897, with almost 67,000 habitants, that it became part of Barcelona itself. Gràcia was flourishing yet it still lacked basic services and facilities. Over the years it has become the thriving hub it is today, boasting markets, cultural, sports and historical centres, medical services and schools.

Its cobbled streets and enchanting squares

Despite being located a stone’s throw away from the centre of Barcelona, the streets of the neighbourhood of Gràcia still conserve that charming allure often only found in small villages. 

Stroll along its streets lined with flowering trees, take a break in one of its many squares with a freshly brewed cup of coffee, or explore the Plaça de la Vila square with its 19th-century bell tower and Plaça de la Virreina with its beautiful stone church.

The Festes de Gràcia

Every August the streets of the neighbourhood of Gràcia come alive with locals and tourists alike. The Festa Major de Gràcia constitutes a weeklong celebration in which the streets of this charming area are decorated with recycled materials in every colour.

The residents of many streets and squares in the neighbourhood come together as a community to choose a theme of their own for their respective streets in a fun-filled family-friendly event that cannot be missed. Read more about this tradition in one of our past articles here.

Neighbourhood of Gràcia, a street decorated to look like Moscow Red Square

Alternative stores and independent boutiques

Gràcia is home to a plethora of shops that sell locally made products, ethical goods and gifts galore. With something for everyone, after exploring its streets, why not browse its second-hand book stores with faded armchairs, discover its designer boutiques with clothes designed in Barcelona or choose a custom-made piece of jewellery at one of its many workshops.

Casa Vicens

Opened to the public only a few years ago, many still don’t know that Gràcia boasts its very own piece of Gaudí. Constituting great architect’s first project, Gaudí was commissioned to build Casa Vicens as a summerhouse for the family of the same name. 

This wonderful building will surprise you with its range of influences from far and wide, its varied palette of colours and its spectacular design.

Neighbourhood of Gràcia - Casa Vicens

The history beneath your feet at Plaça del Diamant

On first glance, Plaça del Diamant may appear to be just your normal square, however if you look a little closer you’ll discover the history it houses. 

Underneath the square is a bomb shelter that was built during the Spanish Civil War with a capacity for 200 people. Tickets are only €3 and must be booked in advance. 

Plaça del Diamant - Neighbourhood of Gràcia

We hope you love the area as much as us! Let us know, what’s your favourite thing to do in Gràcia?

Easter Week in Barcelona – 4 days to celebrate

Easter Week in Barcelona is an important time of year at which locals get together with friends and families to celebrate many a festivity, just like many places around the world.

Easter Week

Easter Week is celebrated across the country, from the largest cities to the smallest villages, yet in Barcelona you’re sure to experience celebrations like no other with a long line of typical Catalan traditions.

So if you’re thinking of spending the Easter week in Barcelona, here are a few useful tips to make sure you don’t miss out on the most typical events and cultural traditions.

Semana Santa (Holy Week) in Barcelona 2022: 15th April – 18th April

‘Semana Santa’ translates as Holy Week and it is an important week in the Christian calendar. Barcelona, as part of Catalunya, is traditionally less religious than other parts of Spain, particularly in the South. However, it still has its fair share of celebrations during this period.

Holy week is the week before Easter and starts with Palm Sunday. It includes Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday but does not include Easter Sunday.

Holy week begins on Palm Sunday, when a procession traditionally takes place around the cathedral with people holding palms. A week of religious ceremonies follows, ending on Easter Sunday.

Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday is most likely the most important of all Easter Week in Barcelona. We recommend you head to the Gothic quarter and catch the “La Burreta” (donkey) procession that commemorates Jesus’s arrival in Jerusalem. 

Easter week in Barcelona blessing of the Palm branches
Easter Week in Barcelona

Keep an eye out for the olive and palm branches carried by children to the local churches to be blessed. You’ll also see them hanging from doors and balconies to ward off evil spirits.

Good Friday is another important date in the liturgical calendar. The Cathedral of Barcelona, and many other local churches, will commemorate this day and the Stations of the Cross with a Via Crucis mass.

Typical sweets

When it comes to food, Easter wouldn’t be Easter without its sweet and savoury delicacies. In between exploring the city and its Easter customs, we recommend taking a break and recharging your batteries with the best of Catalan cuisine.

“La Mona” is a local Easter cake typically made from chocolate and decorated with small figures and animals, chocolate eggs and other sweet treats. Today these cakes are true works of art, but they were originally made from a round sweet brioche and topped with hard-boiled eggs with its tradition dating back to Roman times.

Easter week in Barcelona typical Mona de Pascua

Be sure to drop in to a local bakery to marvel at these fantastic creations or pick one up and try it for yourself!

What’s more, as it is Christian tradition not to eat meat on Good Friday, make sure you also try the typical cod dishes served at local restaurants. Our favourite is the salted codfish in a vegetable sauce, bacallà amb sanfaina.

Must visit

If you’re spending the whole week in Barcelona, we’d also recommend day trips to the villages of Cervera or Verges with processions that you won’t see anywhere else in the world. From Cervera’s skeletons that dance the “Dance of Death” to the Verges Procession in which the entire village takes part, be prepared to be amazed.

Easter week in Barcelona celebration and processions

Now you know the dates for Easter Week in 2021 therefore, no excuses for a trip to Barcelona! and now that you have decided to spend Easter Week in Barcelona, why not stay at one of our centrally located flats to make sure you don’t miss a thing?