Taxis in Barcelona – The best guide step by step

Taxis in Barcelona are available 24-hours a day thanks to the city’s ample cab network. Getting a taxi can be one of the quickest and simplest ways to get around the city. Prices can be cheaper than other cities throughout Europe and waiting times dramatically lower.

Whether you need to take a taxi from the Barcelona El Prat airport, if you miss the night bus mid-week after an evening of dinner and drinks, or when returning to your apartment after a day sight-seeing, getting a taxi in Barcelona is often an essential part of your stay in Barcelona.

We understand that jumping in a taxi abroad can be a daunting experience if you’re not prepared. That’s why we’ve put together this brief guide to taxis in Barcelona.

taxis in barcelona

Official taxis in Barcelona

You can’t miss the taxis in Barcelona thanks to their black and yellow colours. Keep an eye out for the lights on top of the car: green means available and orange means that the taxi is occupied.

If you’re staying in one of our well-located apartments, you’ll probably only have to wait a few minutes before spotting a taxi to hail down. Remember that some of the central streets in Barcelona are pedestrianised, so you may have a to walk to a main street to get a cab.

Taxi ranks in Barcelona

As in many cities, it is very common to hail a cab down by raising your hand from the side of the road when you see a taxi with a green light. However, there are of course many taxi ranks scattered throughout the city to make finding a taxi that little bit easier.

Bear in mind that the taxi driver can only stop if their car is free and it has not been reserved, and you are currently more than 200 metres away from a taxi rank. What’s more, taxi drivers can refuse to drive passengers under the influence of alcohol and drugs. They are also not obliged to accept animals (with the exception of guide dogs).

There are more than 300 taxi ranks around the city, all which can be consulted here. The city’s biggest ranks can be found at the three airport terminals, the four stations of the Barcelona Port (Moll Adossat) and Estació de Sants.

How much are taxis in Barcelona?

Taxis in Barcelona are more expensive than other forms of public transport in the city such and the bus and metro, however they are affordable and not as expensive as other European cities, as we have mentioned.

All taxis in Barcelona use a meter, so you don’t have to worry about being ripped off. Fares in Barcelona depend on the time of day and if you are travelling on a national holiday. The minimum price for taxis in Barcelona is €2.25 except on Saturdays and holidays between 8 pm and 8 am, when the minimum charge goes up to €3.20.

Remember that the following supplements are added to the final price shown on the meter at the end of the journey:

  • Airport (origin/destination): €4.30 (see below for more information about getting a taxi to/from the airport)
  • Port station (Moll Adossat) (origin): €4.30
  • Main city stations (Sants Station and Fira Exhibition Centre): €2.50
  • Vehicles for 4–8 passengers: €4.30
  • Special nights*: €3.10

*23/06 – 24/06, 24/12 – 25/12 and 31/12 – 01/1

Here you can find a breakdown table of the fares and tariffs for taxis in Barcelona. You can also calculate the estimated cost of your route in advance of your journey here or download the official app for your phone to use it on the go.

If you are unsure whether you should leave a tip or not, check our article here about tipping in Barcelona.

Taxi in Barcelona

Taxis in Barcelona to/from the airport

When you land at Barcelona El Prat airport, we understand that you want to get to your apartment as soon as possible and start enjoying the city straight away. Getting a taxi from the airport is simple – you’ll find several taxi ranks at both terminals. Simply follow the signs after passport control

The minimum cost of a taxi to and from Barcelona airport is always €20 and generally journeys tend to cost between €30–€35 to and from the city centre.

Getting a taxi in Barcelona during the COVID-19 pandemic – May 2020

It is still possible to take a taxi in Barcelona during the COVID-19 pandemic, however it is mandatory to observe the following rules:

  • As of 3 May 2020, it is mandatory to wear a mask when using public transport
  • A maximum of one passenger is allowed per journey, unless you are accompanying a disabled individual or a minor
  • Open the taxi door using your non-dominant hand
  • Sit in the back of the taxi and follow social distancing rules
  • Taxi drivers will issue receipts only on request

Getting a taxis in Barcelona can be a daunting task – but not any more! Remember you can consult the Barcelona official public transport page here to find further information on taxis in Barcelona in English.

Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona

Choosing the places to visit in Barcelona in a city so rich in culture and entertainment, can present quite a challenge, particularly if your time here is limited. In order to help with this dilemma, we have compiled a helpful list of places to visit in Barcleona.

Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona during your stay

  1. La Sagrada Familia

No visit to Barcelona would be complete without a trip to Antoni Guadí´s spectacular church, La Sagrada Familia. The structure, although still incomplete, is a UNESCO world heritage site which welcomes nearly 3 million visitors a year. With this in mind, it is worth buying tickets in advance as queues can be lengthy. Places to visit in Barcelona - sagrada familia

  1. La Pedrera

Continue along the Guadí trail to Casa Milà, commonly known as La Pedrera. This beautiful building, complete with roof terrace, attic space, courtyards and exhibition hall, provides ample opportunity to admire and understand the work of this architectural genius.Places to visit in Barcelona - La Pedrera

  1. Parc Güell

Set on the hillside, Park Güell boasts beautiful views of the city. Originally, commissioned by Eusebio Güell for Barcelona´s aristocracy, this space reflects Guadí´s passion for nature, colour and unique architectural form.

Places to visit in Barcelona - Parc Güell
  1. La Rambla

Stroll down Barcelona´s vibrant, street La Rambla and you´ll find live performances, artists, human statue art, a Miró mosaic and stalls. Spanish poet Federico García Lorca once commented, “It is the only street in the world I wish would never end” and, after a walk down this leafy, pedestrianised street, it’s easy to see why.Places to visit in Barcelona - La Rambla

  1. La Boqueria Market

Located off La Rambla is one of Europe´s most famous food markets. Whether you simply want to peruse the specialist food stalls or pull up a stool at one of the bars for a snack, this venue is definitely worth a visit.Places to go in Barcelona - La Boqueria Market

  1. Montjuïc Hill

Escape the crowds and head to Montjuïc hill. The area plays host to several museums such as the Joan Miró Foundation, the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and the castle, which is an old military fortress dating back to 1640.

Places to go in Barcelona -Montjuïc Hill
  1. The Magic Montjuïc Fountains

At night witness the Magic Fountain Show. This explosion of colour, water, movement and light set to music lives up to the name and provides a truly magical experience. By the way, this is one of our favourite places to visit in Barcelona, you will love it!

Places to go in Barcelona -Montjuïc Fountain
  1. Poble Espayol

Located near the Montjuic Fountains is Poble Espanyol (Spanish Village). The village, built in 1929, has 117 buildings resembling architecture from across Spain´s regions and offers a variety of shops, eateries, stalls and craft workshops. poble-espanyol-barcelona

  1. Camp Nou

For football fans, no visit to the city would be complete without a trip to Camp Nou, home of the legendary Barça. Even if you aren´t able to coincide your stay with a match, it is worth taking a tour of the impressive 99,354 seat stadium and museum. Camp nou

  1. Barri Gòtic

Finally, take time to meander the winding streets of the Gothic Quarter and admire the beautiful Roman and Medieval architecture. Dotted among impressive buildings such as the cathedral and iconic squares are plenty of bars and cafes for you to take time out and sample the local cuisine or simply sit back and soak up the atmosphere.

Barcelona Gothic quarter, Carrer del Bisbe

This  Top 10 places to visit in Barcelona, are a must during your visit, but also they are just an starter. Also remember we will be pleased to help you finding your apartment in Barcelona.

Also you can check the places to visit in Barcelona depending on the days  you are going to spend in the city:

Barcelona is waiting for your, are you ready for the trip to one of the most amazing cities in the world? Let’s go!

Pa de Sant Jordi Recipe

Sant Jordi is one of the most eagerly awaited days on the Catalan calendar. This year the great literary event has officially been postponed to 23rdJuly, yet as we explain in our article here, you can still celebrate this much-loved event from home on 23rdApril.

So whilst at home this Thursday why not try your hand at baking one of our favourite Sant Jordi recipes? What better way to enjoy your favourite books than with the smell of freshly baked bread floating through your home?

We’d like to share with you the recipe for Pa de Sant Jordi (Sant Jordi bread), which was first made 25 years ago by a baker in Barcelona. Normally sold in bakeries across the region, with this traditional yet simple recipe that even the youngest members of the family can help with, you can recreate the colours of the senyera (the Catalan flag) at home. Enjoy!

Ingredients

500 g of strong flour
– 80 g of grated emmental or Parmesan cheese
– 80 g of Mallorcan sobrasada sausage 

– 40 g of walnuts or mixed nuts
– 8 g of yeast
350 ml of lukewarm water
– 2 tablespoons of olive oil or butter
– 1 teaspoon of salt
– 1 teaspoon of sugar

Method

Please note: Remember to wash your hands thoroughly and any work surfaces before starting to bake.

Finely chop the nuts and put them to one side. Take the Mallorcan sobrasada out of the fridge.

Next measure out 350 ml of lukewarm water. Add the yeast and stir making sure there are no lumps.

Measure out the flour and add it to a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle and add the water and yeast, the salt and the olive oil.

Mix together and knead slowly until the dough no longer sticks to your hands or to the side of the bowl. If necessary add more flour. Cover the dough with a cloth and put it aside for 30 minutes. 

Next, divide the dough into three equal parts – one for each of the flavours.

Add the room temperature Mallorcan sobrasada sausage to one, the cheese to another and the chopped nuts to the final part. Mix each section of the dough together with its ingredient and knead well for ten minutes. Cover with a cloth and leave them to rest for one hour.

Now it’s time to shape the bread. Shape four strips of sobrasada mix and five of strips of cheese mix. With the nuts mix make one longer and thicker strip, which will act as the frame of the flag. Stick the strips together in the form of the Catalan flag using wet fingers if necessary.

In a pre-heated oven at 190 degrees, cook the bread for around 45 minutes. It’s really important not to open the oven during this time to ensure the bread rises properly

Once the bread is golden brown, take it out of the oven and let cool on a rack.

Serve with your favourite book!

We hope you enjoy your Pa de Sant Jordi from home this year!

PA-DE-SANT-JORDI RECIPE

Travel to Barcelona 2020: Facing Trying Times

Hello From Barcelona,

One year ago Mercedes took this picture of me on the terrace of our lovely Ferran Batik apartment in sunny Barcelona. Little did we know at the time, that today there would be no travel to Barcelona, or anywhere else, and I would be writing this message from the cocoon of our home as we follow the rule book of a new world: instructions to stay home, maintain social distances, etc. In short, everything that all visitors to Barcelona used to like doing is now verboten.

Read more
Dolphins in Barcelona during quarantine

Dolphins take advantage of lockdown in Barcelona to swim in one of the city’s ports

The quarantine is generating a whole parade of animals that can be seen in places where until a few days ago it was unimaginable.

 

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A new date for Sant Jordi 2020!

A new date has been announced for Sant Jordi 2020. This year, given the current circumstances, the official Booksellers Guild and Florists Guild of Catalonia have decided to postpone this eagerly awaited event on the Catalan calendar in line with Government guidelines. 

Sant Jordi – which is normally celebrated every year on World Book Day on 23rdApril – will be postponed to 23rdJuly with the safety of all in mind. All events, workshops and readings will also be postponed to this date, in addition to the Sant Jordi discount on books.

Why is Sant Jordi so important?

If you’ve had the chance to experience this day in Barcelona before, you’ll understand just how important it is. It is a day on which the young and old alike take to the streets to buy their loved ones a gift. All the main streets of Barcelona are lined with bookstalls and on every corner you’ll find rose sellers selling single roses. 

The origin of this literary celebration is a popular story in many cultures and is based on the story of Sant Jordi and the dragon. To read more about its history and how it’s celebrated, check out our Sant Jordi article here.

Sant Jordi at home

Lovers of Sant Jordi don’t despair! The good news is that you don’t need to wait until July to celebrate this wonderful event. Sant Jordi can also be celebrated from home!

This year, Casa Batlló is encouraging the citizens of Barcelona to bring the magic of Sant Jordi into their own homes. Every year on this day, this beautiful Gaudí house inspired by the mythical dragon is normally adorned with hundreds of red roses. 

So, be sure to follow the #SantJordialBalcons (SantJordiBalconies) initiative on social media and join in from home by decorating your own balcony with pictures, roses, dragons and book covers. Avoid boredom by getting creative and painting, drawing and making together with your loved ones.

Remember to upload your pictures to social media with the above hash tag. The ten publications with the most likes will win a collection of children’s books. 

What’s more, another way to rediscover the story of the princess and the dragon is to head to your balcony, window or terrace at 12 pm and at 6 pm next Thursday. The Booksellers Guild is encouraging everyone to read their favourite stories aloud or to listen those of their neighbour’s. What’s more, afterwards there will be an applause for our favourite local bookstores.

Supporting local booksellers

Additionally, don’t forget that although bookstores throughout the city are closed, it’s still possible to buy books online from local sellers. Thanks to the platform “LlibreriesObertes” (OpenBookstores), you can order your books and pick them up once the lockdown regulations have been lifted.

The initiative was launched in order to support these local publishers and bookstores during these times of hardship. With the objective of selling 30,000 books, these advance sales will ensure the survival of the city’s bookstores.

Check out the website here and help support Barcelona’s bookstores: https://llibreriesobertes.cat

How will you be celebrating Sant Jordi at home this year? Let us know and stay safe!

Pa amb tomàquet recipe step by step

Here is a really easy recipe to make “Pa amb tomàquet” (Catalan tomato bread), one of Catalonia’s most typical dishes!

How to do pà amb tomàquet

Ingredients:

  • Bread (If you can order Pà de Pagès (farmhouse loaf) even better)
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Peeled garlic
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt

1) Cut the bread into slices.
2) Toast the slices
3) Rub the toast with the garlic
4) Cut the tomato in half down the middle
5) Rub the tomato into the bread

Season with oil and salt and eat immediately so that it does not soften.

It can be accompanied by cold cuts, cheese, anchovies, omelette, etc.

8 essential Catalan phrases you can’t visit Barcelona without knowing

On your next trip to Barcelona you may be thinking that you can just get by with Spanish or English, but if you really want to impress and get to know the locals, these essential Catalan words and phrases will go a long way.

Why not use your time at home over the next few weeks to brush up your language skills in one of Spain’s official languages and add some of these useful phrases to your repertoire.

Whether you’re greeting a friend, ordering food or buying souvenirs, we’ve definitely got you covered. Preparats (ready)? 

1. Bon dia (bon dee-ah) / Bona tarda (bon-ah tard-ah)

Good morning / Good afternoon 

When strolling along the streets of Barcelona, you’ll definitely hear this phrase used again and again. Put a smile on any local’s face with this common greeting (used more than “hola”). Remember, the afternoon starts around lunchtime and lasts all the way until just before dinnertime – which is around 10 pm – so don’t be surprised if someone greets you with “bona tarda” at 8 pm!

2. Si us plau (see oos plow)  & Merci (mehr-see) 

Please & thank you

If you’ve visited Barcelona several times and are familiar with the Catalan language, you’ll know has some similarities with the French language. These two phrases will go a long way during your stay, so please use them abundantly. 

With “merci”, remember to put emphasis on the first syllable “meras opposed to on the final syllable, like in French.

Note: “merci” is used a lot more than “gràcies” but please take into account is is colloquial.

3. De res (deh res) 

You’re welcome

If it makes it a little easier to remember, you can literally translate this phrase as “of nothing”. What’s more it’s just like the French (de rien) and Spanish (de nada).

4. Adéu (ah-deh-ou)

Goodbye

Whether your waving farewell to your new Catalan friends or simply saying goodbye to the owners of your new favourite restaurant, be sure to do so with a friendly and heartfelt “adéu.

5. Bon profit! (bon pro-feet) 

Bon appetit!

The Catalans are a very courteous bunch, so don’t be surprised if you get total strangers declaring “bon profit” as you tuck into your meal at a local restaurant. 

6. Quant costa – ? (kwant coh-sta)

How much is –?

The chances are during your stay at some point you’ll be buying souvenirs, tickets for the museum or a little treat for yourself. Use this phrase and simply add whatever it is you’re asking for or point and say “això” (ay-shoh), which means “this”.

7.El compte, si us plau (el com-teh see oos plow)

The bill, please.

Show off your language skills and impress your friends by asking for the bill in Catalan at the end of your meal. If you really want to blend in with the locals, try switching this phrase for “Em cobres” (um cub-ras), which literally means “charge me” and is used much more frequently by Catalans.

8. Parles anglès? (par-las ang-less)?

Do you speak English?

Whilst the majority of locals speak very good English, this polite question is sure to make you many a new friend in the city. Not only will they be impressed with your Catalan skills, they’ll be grateful you are trying to learn their language.

While we’ve got you covered for the basics, we encourage you to download a learning app or grab a dusty phrase book from your shelf and get studying for your next trip to Barcelona! 

See you soon! Ens veiem aviat!

P.S. Below is a small list of other some additional vocabulary we’re sure will come in useful!

CATALAN ENGLISH 
Bona nit Good night 
Perdó Sorry 
Esmorzar Breakfast 
Dinar Lunch
Sopar Dinner
Esquerra Left 
Dreta Right 
Obert Open 
Carrer Street 
Plaça Square